Lake surrounded by green grass, forest with the Sierra Nevada Mountains in the backgroundGraphic: water drop shape for water journey sliderGraphic: dark blue upside-down water drop shape

Currently, 70% of water used in
the Tri-Valley is imported from
outside our region. How in the
world does it get to the Tri-Valley?
Follow along with us on our
water’s journey as it travels from
the snow packed peaks of the
Northern Sierra Nevada to the
homes and businesses of the
Tri-Valley area.

Follow along Tri-Valley’s water journey
Lake surrounded by green grass, forest with the Sierra Nevada Mountains in the backgroundGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

The journey begins at one of the
highest points in California at the
Sierra Nevada. The rainfall and
snow collected on these mountain
tops each winter melts in the
spring which is how our water’s
journey begins.

Feather Falls WaterfallGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

The freshly melted water pours
over the beautiful Feather Falls.

Lake Oroville surrounded by trees and rocksGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

The water then flows into Lake
Oroville, a precious reservoir for
our state water system.

Aerial of Dam at Lake OrovilleGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

When it is needed, the California
Department of Water Resources
will release water through the
Oroville Dam into the Feather River.

Mountain View of Feather FallsGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

Water will then travel along
the Feather River for 127 miles
until it reaches the Sacramento
San Joaquin Delta. Quite the
journey already! And we are
only halfway there!

Aerial of Delta surrounded by green landscapeGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

You will often hear the Sacramento
San Joaquin Delta referred to as
the California Delta, the San
Francisco Bay Delta or simply the
Delta. The Delta is important as it
creates a “fork in the road” as water
begins to diverge into different
directions. One important
divergence for the Tri-Valley is here,
where water is pumped from the
Delta into the California Aqueduct.

California Aqueduct surrounded by brown hillsGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

Water from the California Aqueduct
flows into Bethany Reservoir where it
makes another important divergence.
Here water is pumped into the South
Bay Aqueduct, a series of man-made
channels and pipes that bring most of
our water into the Tri-Valley. Situated
northwest of the Altamont Hills, it
moves water in the channel into
eastern Alameda County.

Aerial of South Bay AqueductGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

The water will continue to one of
two reservoirs in the Tri-Valley,
Lake Del Valle, or Patterson Pass
Reservoir, which store or hold the
majority of our surface water.

Three white liquid oxygen tanks and Ozone Generator BuildingGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

Water can be pumped from the
reservoirs when needed to be
treated at one of the Zone 7
water treatment facilities.

City of Pleasanton Town sign with buildings and cars belowGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

After treatment, it continues its
journey to our homes and
businesses through our network of
Tri-Valley water partners.

Learn more about the partners on
our partner page.

A person filling their Tri-Valley water bottle with water from the sink.Graphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

What a journey that was!

Our water must travel over 200
miles before beginning the
treatment process that makes it
safe for our everyday use!

Lake surrounded by green grass, forest with the Sierra Nevada Mountains in the backgroundGraphic: water drop shape for water journey sliderGraphic: dark blue upside-down water drop shape

Currently, 70% of water used in
the Tri-Valley is imported from
outside our region. How in the
world does it get to the Tri-Valley?
Follow along with us on our
water’s journey as it travels from
the snow packed peaks of the
Northern Sierra Nevada to the
homes and businesses of the
Tri-Valley area.

Follow along Tri-Valley’s water journey
Lake surrounded by green grass, forest with the Sierra Nevada Mountains in the backgroundGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

The journey begins at one of the
highest points in California at the
Sierra Nevada. The rainfall and
snow collected on these mountain
tops each winter melts in the
spring which is how our water’s
journey begins.

Feather Falls WaterfallGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

The freshly melted water
pours over the beautiful
Feather Falls.

Lake Oroville surrounded by trees and rocksGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

The water then flows into
Lake Oroville, a precious
reservoir for our state water
system.

Aerial of Dam at Lake OrovilleGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

When it is needed, the California
Department of Water Resources
will release water through the
Oroville Dam into the Feather River.

Mountain View of Feather FallsGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

Water will then travel along
the Feather River for 127
miles until it reaches the
Sacramento San Joaquin
Delta. Quite the journey
already! And we are only
halfway there!

Aerial of Delta surrounded by green landscapeGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

You will often hear the
Sacramento San Joaquin Delta
referred to as the California
Delta, the San Francisco Bay
Delta or simply the Delta. The
Delta is important as it creates a
“fork in the road” as water
begins to diverge into different
directions. One important
divergence for the Tri-Valley is
here, where water is pumped
from the Delta into the
California Aqueduct.

California Aqueduct surrounded by brown hillsGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

Water from the California
Aqueduct flows into Bethany
Reservoir where it makes
another important divergence.
Here water is pumped into the
South Bay Aqueduct, a series of
man-made channels and pipes
that bring most of our water into
the Tri-Valley. Situated
northwest of the Altamont Hills,
it moves water in the channel
into eastern Alameda County.

Aerial of South Bay AqueductGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

The water will continue to one of
two reservoirs in the Tri-Valley,
Lake Del Valle, or Patterson Pass
Reservoir, which store or hold the
majority of our surface water.

Three white liquid oxygen tanks and Ozone Generator BuildingGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

Water can be pumped from the
reservoirs when needed to be
treated at one of the Zone 7
water treatment facilities.

City of Pleasanton Town sign with buildings and cars belowGraphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

After treatment, it continues
its journey to our homes and
businesses through our
network of Tri-Valley water
partners.

Learn more about the
partners on our partner
page.

A person filling their Tri-Valley water bottle with water from the sink.Graphic: water drop shape for water journey slider

What a journey that was!

Our water must travel over 200
miles before beginning the
treatment process that makes it
safe for our everyday use!